click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
it operates, or its effects on the ground. but frontline has spent months traveling through afghanistan, investigating how this secret campaign is conducted, what it's doing to the taliban and al qaeda, and whether it can play a decisive part in ending the war. >> narrator: our journey begins in khost province, eastern afghanistan. this is where al qaeda trained some of the 9/11 hijackers. it's now the heartland of the haqqani network, a ruthless branch of the taliban insurgency responsible for some of the most vicious attacks of the war. over the past year, there's been a dramatic escalation of kill/capture missions here. we're with the soldiers of the 101st airborne division and their afghan counterparts. they've received intelligence that a wanted taliban leader is hiding out nearby. >> we're going after a mid-level insurgent here in the district. guy's name is gulab, this guy right here. he's an ied facilitator, kidnapper, just all-around bad guy. we're going to do an air assault on his compound. >> roger, we copy. ( helicopter blades whirring ) >> narrator: in khost and across the
. >> let's shift to afghanistan and the taliban. any opening there? the mother might be some stuff going on behind the scenes. that is actually one of the problems. you do not have a single channel. you do not have a single diplomatic framework like you did in the northern ireland. you have a number of governments that are getting mixed messages to the taliban. >> who are those governments? >> pakistanis, afghanistan, america, uae, turkey. there are a variety of people putting out overtures, and that is confusing. these terrorists are not the most sophisticated actors in the world. they are generally young men who have been indoctrinated from a young age. having so many people involved in this is confusing. you need to create a single channel and coordinate the message. we're not doing that yet. we do not have the intelligence assets -- the insides that we need into the taliban. there was an embarrassing incident a couple of months ago, where we thought it on the number two person in the taliban, mullah omar, who wanted to talk, thought there might be room for negotiation and compromise,
of nato. we have forces in international military operations. >> woodruff: afghanistan. >> libya. >> libya, and we are also doing peace facilitation which can make us a target. we have been on sri lanka. we have been in haiti, sudan, lots of places talking to people, which don't necessarily share our views on that. >> woodruff: as you look at these pictures of your home country, what comes to your mind. >> i'm saddened to see the report. you just had here. i live 10 minutes walking distance from the prime minister's office and this is a lively part of oslo and knowing that norway has been attacked by somebody, it's hard to understand, all my friends in norway are still in shock. there will be some hard days to come. and we are not sure how to deal with this at the moment. and there are so many unanswered questions. why did they do this? was he alone. is it part of an international terror organization which the police say is probably not. but how can people go to bed tonight. >> woodruff: well, that's a very good question. how can people go to bed tonight. ahnders tvegard here in washington
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)